Reveries

A mishmash of spirituality, human relationship, adult and children's literature, news analyses and anti-road-rage tirades

Two Monkeys

Necessity is the mother of invention.

Last year my little daughter (who was three and a half then) had to participate in a story-telling competition at school. The challenge was that the story had to be both very, very short and unique at the same time. In spite of my several searches on the Internet, I couldn’t zero in on any such story.

Finally, I decided to pen it down myself. I also got it illustrated by sourcing freely-available images from the Internet and layouting them with some help from my colleague Sudhir Sharma.

What came out is in front of you. Do give it a read and please do not forget to leave a comment!

Two Monkeys

 

Once there were two monkeys. One was Chinu and the other was Duggu.

Chinu and Duggu

Chinu and DugguImage Courtesy: Internet, Ranjit K Sharma, Sudhir Sharma

Chinu used to eat only chocolates and fries.

Chinu's Junk Food

Chinu’s Junk FoodImage Courtesy: Internet, Ranjit K Sharma, Sudhir Sharma

Duggu loved to eat dal, roti and fruits.

Duggu's Food

Duggu’s Food – Image Courtesy: Internet, Ranjit K Sharma, Sudhir Sharma

When Duggu grew up, he became a famous doctor.

Duggu as Doctor

Duggu as Doctor – Image Courtesy: Internet, Ranjit K Sharma, Sudhir Sharma

Chinu too grew up but fell ill. He went to Duggu and said, “Dr Duggu, will you cure me?”

 

And Duggu offered him treatments. Chinu finally got well.

Chinu Fell Ill

Chinu Fell Ill – Image Courtesy: Internet, Ranjit K Sharma, Sudhir Sharma

Chinu left eating chocolates and fries. He promised to eat dal, roti and fruits instead.

 

Chinu became healthier and worked hard to be a famous farmer.

Chinu as Farmer

Chinu as Farmer – Image Courtesy: Internet, Ranjit K Sharma, Sudhir Sharma

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Filed under: Children's Literature, Flash Fiction, , , , , , ,

My Workshop on E-Learning Products

Ranjit K Sharma conducting the sales presentation

Ranjit K Sharma conducting the sales presentation

See me conducting a workshop on the new e-learning projects of Madhubun Books for the national sales personnel.

The event is a part of Madhubun’s annual National Book Launch Conference held between October 4-6, 2010 at Hotel Clarks Shiraz, Agra. It was participated by a strong audience of 200 professionals comprising 150 Madhubun sales personnel and 50 invited dignitaries that included authors of Madhubun books and principals and senior teachers of leading schools from Agra, Kanpur and Lucknow. Dignitaries also included, among others, Sajili Shirodkar, Director, Vikas Publishing; Deepa Baruah, Editorial Manager, Madhubun Books and Sanyukta Ludra, Editor-in-Chief (Hindi), Madhubun Books.

Here are the links to my photostreams:

Filed under: Children's Educational Books, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Sex and Murder: Yet another Angle

The Daughter and Her Beau

The Daughter and Her Beau (Photo Courtesy: The Hindu)

“A young school teacher and her male friend have been arrested for allegedly stabbing her mother to death at her Paschim Vihar residence this past week and then trying to pass it off as a murder during a robbery.”

……………….

“The young man brought a bottle of beer with him and the two made themselves cosy in the house. But Sakshi’s mother, who had gone to a religious congregation in the neighbourhood, happened to return earlier than expected. She had the key to one of the entrances and caught the two red-handed. The woman lost her temper on seeing them together and screamed at them.”

These are the lines from a recent news story. Kindly read the story first in order to enjoy the discussions below.

While prima facie the murder seems to be a typical example of Walter Cannon’s fight-or-flight response of human beings towards stress-causing situations, a closure look can reveal deeper implications of the mental make-up that the youth of today possess. The first impression that any keen observer will have at this level is that the daughter displayed a total lack of values.

I am not going into the humdrum of casting aspersions on the very sexual act that was the kingpin behind the brutal murder of a mother at the hands of her own daughter. Let me assume the intercourse as an ordinary act of wrong-doing, one of hundreds of evil deeds that everyone of us does during the span of our lifetime.

Having assumed the act of Sakshi calling her beau and her subsequent engaging in fornication as ordinary, the only extra-ordinary thing that happened on the fateful day was that she was caught red-handed by her elderly mother. And it is easy for us to imagine how she could have reacted to such an unimaginably bizarre act of perversion that her daughter was seen doing—a daughter completely lost in an orgasmic ‘high’ in between ‘breathful’ of penile thrusts from her partner all in front of her mother! It was but natural for her to lose “her temper on seeing them together and [to scream] at them.”

But how natural was her daughter’s reaction to her? Quite unnatural and very disgustedly undesirable. There were hundred other ways of reacting to her mother’s lambasting words than the one that she and her boyfriend Sunny chose to. There could only be one, if any, in a trillion mothers who were dogged enough so as to not forgive her weeping daughter at her feet. And even if she would not be ready to compromise and be bent on handing her over to the police, what loss could the daughter have incurred in even receiving the noose from her mother? At least she would not have been accused of the grave moral crime for which she is imprisoned now.

Filed under: Current News, Philosophy, Relationships, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Time to Read(?)

Photo Credit: Wikipedia

Mortimer Adler in 1988 Photo Credit: Wikipedia

When I was in the tenth standard, the following essay by Mortimer Adler had a lasting impact on my mind. It was a part of our English curriculum in the form of a textbook, Learners’ English. Years later, I am still fascinated by its relevance to the current times, more so when the good, old habit of children’s reading books is in its way to the coffin, what with the advent of e-books, intensive study-packages, et al! I am thankful to him (whom I wished I could meet one day; but alas, he left for his heavenly abode in 2001, much before I could afford to visit the U.S.!) and M/s Sawpon Dowerah (who also served as my teacher for sometime) and T. C. Baruah for having included this piece in their anthology.

Please click on the following link to download a PDf document and read: What is a Great Book?

Filed under: Children's Literature, General Awareness, Philosophy, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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© Ranjit K Sharma, 2008-16

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